Media News & Content
The Internet as a Way to Fight Antisemitism PDF Print

Dates: 9-10 November 2017

Country: UK and Europe

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The 9th and 10th of November mark the No Hate Speech Movement’s Action Day countering antisemitic hate speech. It is also on these date in 1938 when the Kristallnacht occurred in Germany; a pogrom targeting the Jewish community. These two days urge people to think about antisemitism today, a form of hate speech which is still very much present.

The internet acts as a two-edged sword when it comes to hate speech. On one hand, it offers those with hateful things to say an easy avenue to do so. The internet can keep someone anonymous and allows them to detach from what they are saying, giving people an outlet to say things which they might never say to someone in person. However, amongst these hateful incidents, the Internet also facilitates more ways to fight antisemitism. People are able to speak up about antisemitism via social media in a way that they could not before.

 
Harvey Weinstein: Why Did It Take So Long? PDF Print

Published: 27 October 2017

Country: USA

Weinstein_victimEver since The New York Times published a report detailing Weinstein’s abusive behavior over the past few decades, the story has snowballed into a massive Hollywood scandal. Countless actresses have come forward accusing Weinstein of sexual assault and in response, The Weinstein Company has fired Harvey Weinstein. The case had opened up discussions about sexual harassment in Hollywood and entertainment industries. The media have given a voice to victims However, there is one detail that cannot be ignored.

The Weinstein case was not news to a lot of people. In fact, many people were aware of his behavior for a long time. So why did it take so long for the story to reach the public? How was the story buried for so long in the age of Internet and social media? Does this case prove how much professional and trusted mainstream outlets such as the New York Times are needed?

 
Lack of Media Coverage on Discrimination against Roma in Serbia PDF Print

Published: 27 October 2017

Country: Serbia

Dusan_Jovanovic_Roma_SerbiaMost of the Serbian media failed to report that 20 years ago two teenagers killed Dušan Jovanović, a 13-year old Roma boy. Dušan was on his way to a store near his home in the evening of 18 October 1997 when he was stopped by a group of skinheads who started beating and kicking him all over his body. He died on the street as a result of the beating, his skull smashed with a section of drainpipe.

The Serbian edition of Vice provided the most relevant and in-depth analysis on this case of discrimination against Roma. But tabloid Blic and RTV B92 for instance, republished parts of an interview with one of two teenagers convicted of murder.

 
Tight Control of Online News Portals in Malaysia PDF Print

Published: 16 October 2017

Country: Malaysia

Zunar_HRW_ReportIn the last year the authorities in Malaysia have been closing down news portals which were mostly critical of the Government and the Prime Minister. Since Malaysia follows the global trend of consuming news trough social media platforms and online portals, not only that critical voices are endangered but also many marginalised voices that can express themselves only in the digital space.

The news consumption among Malaysians has dramatically changed over the last 10 years. A recent report has revealed that 86% of Malaysians get informed trough social media and on online portals, while 54% and 45% use TV and print media. Media analysts explain that many Malaysians turned to online platforms because of declining credibility of the mainstream media. But by the end of 2017 the Government is planning to introduce a law that will require online news portals to register with the Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC).

 
Las Vegas Shooting: ‘Lone Wolf’ or ‘Terrorist’? PDF Print

Published: 5 October 2017

Country: USA

Screen_Shot_2017-10-05_at_16.37.18The mass shooting in Las Vegas prompted a debate on whether Stephen Padock, who opened the fire at the music festival goers, is a ‘lone wolf’ or a ‘terrorist’.   According to the media reports, Padock killed 58 and injured almost 500 people at the music festival in Las Vegas. Was this an act of domestic terrorism? If so, why some media outlets avoid using the expression 'terrorism'?

“When a Muslim person mows down innocent victims and terrorizes a community, media and authorities are quick to declare it terrorism; when a white, non-Muslim attacker does the same, he is usually described as a disturbed loner in a freak incident. In both cases, journalists arrive at these conclusions early in the news cycle when information is incomplete,” reports Poynter. But the same prominent media platform refused to categorise the Las Vegas shooting as an act of terrorism based on ‘the complete, multi-part definition of domestic terrorism under the U.S. Code’. “We don’t know the Las Vegas shooter’s motives so we can’t call him a terrorist,” states the Poynter’s editorial team.

The British New Statesman claims the opposite saying that ‘motive doesn’t matter’ and that Las Vegas shooting was ‘a terror attack’.

 
“Sunday Beauty Queen” Tells Filipino Workers' Stories PDF Print

Published: 8 August 2017

Country: China, Hong Kong

Sunday_Beauty_Queen_1“Overseas Filipino workers have happy lives in front of the camera. For one day, we are busy with photos and selfies, but behind those smiles, no one really knows what kind of life we are living.” This quote belongs to Cherry, one of the expatriate domestic helpers in Hong Kong featured in a documentary Sunday Beauty Queen. Focusing on an annual beauty pageant organised for Filipino community in Hong Kong, the documentary tells an empowering story and a deeper glance into migrants’ lives.

The film shows preparations of few Filipino workers for the beauty contest while revealing their struggle in everyday life. Most overseas Filipino workers provide domestic help for families in Hong Kong by working for 6 days and living with their employers 24 hours a day. Although their work is paid more in Hong Kong, Filipino migrants still pay a huge price for living abroad.

 
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