Media News & Content
King’s College:”The EU Referendum Campaign was the Most Divisive and Fear-Provoking” PDF Print

Published: 20 June 2017

Country: UK

Kings_College_EU_RefImmigration was the most prominent referendum issue in the UK media during the EU Referendum campaign in 2016, finds a study published by King’s College London’s Centre for the Study of Media, Communication and Power. After analysing 15 000 articles published in the UK during the EU Referendum campaign, King’s College’s researchers concluded that some media outlets blamed migrants for many political, social and economic ills. Some media blamed migrants for taking, but also for not taking British benefits, for violence, rape, traffic congestion, creating a schools crisis, costing a fortune to detain/imprison, even for benefitting from cheaper weddings.

King’s College study also finds that the EU Referendum campaign was ‘the UK’s most divisive, hostile, negative and fear-provoking of the 21st century’ and the national media’s inflammatory rhetoric was at least partly responsible for this. On the subject of anti-immigration sentiments, the researchers argue that although it is impossible to prove a direct link between hate speech and the recorded increase in hate crimes following the referendum, ‘explicitly blaming migrants for economic and social problems […] is almost certain to stoke resentment’.

 
London Attack: Have Some UK Media Overreacted? PDF Print

Published: 24 March 2017

Country: UK

London_attack_front_pagesThe day after the Westminster attack, a number of front pages of British newspapers were filled with words such as “terror”, “rampage”, “maniac”. The breaking news coverage on many radio and TV stations was constant. The so-called columnist Katie Hopkins was again given a platform in some British tabloids and on Fox TV to spread hate, racism, Islamophobia and all sorts of discriminative rhetoric. Some anti-Muslim blogs misused and misinterpreted a photograph of a girl in hijab on Westminster Bridge. Could some media do better than this?

“Journalists struggle with the accelerating pace of the news cycle and the complicated and diverse nature of terrorism itself,” reads the report Reporting Terror in a Networked World, by Charlie Becket for the Tow Centre at Columbia University in New York. “Especially in the context of breaking news,” it continues, “they have to adapt to the speed and complexity of information flows that are increasingly influenced by the authorities, the digital platforms, and even the terrorists themselves”. But have some of the media outlets rushed to characterise the London attack as a "terrorist attack"?

 
Unethical Reporting on Migrants in Serbia PDF Print

Published: 8 February 2017

Country: Serbia

Serbia_Migrants_ObrenovacBy claiming that a group of migrants tried to kidnap a baby as her mother was walking down the street, some Serbian tabloids misinformed the public, thereby causing panic and fear amongst citizens in Obrenovac, a small town near Belgrade. The information about the alleged attack first appeared on Facebook as a post by the baby’s uncle. It was used as a fact and basis for the sensationalist and discriminatory reports on migrants published in the Serbian tabloids Blic, Kurir and Telegraf.

The negative stereotypes and generalisations of migrants as 'ungrateful and unpleasent' quickly appeared in many Serbian media outlets.

 
Black History Month in the UK Media PDF Print

Published: 28 November 2016

Country: UK

BHM_LambethWhat month is the Black History Month (BHM)? If you are an average news consumer in the UK who does not regularly reads the Guardian from page to page, then the answer does not come easily. In many British media outlets there was not enough content dedicated to BHM and the issues of the black community.

One of the positive examples is The Guardian. This newspaper created a special section on their website for the Black History Month, while some other British media did not give the celebration of the black heritage in the UK enough prominence. Some programmes at the BBC were even criticised for racism and stereotyping.

 
Burqa, Veils and Burkini in the Arab Media PDF Print

Published: 19 November 2016

Region: Worldwide

Screen_Shot_2016-11-20_at_11.37.37Indian Sport Shooter Heena Sidhu has decided to “skip the Asian air weapon competition” held in Tehran due to the country’s requirement for all female competitors to wear a hijab. She explained her decision in a few posts in her Twitter account saying: “I’m not revolutionary. But I feel that making it mandatory for even a sportsperson to wear a hijab is not the spirit of sport. I’m proud to be a sportsperson because people from different cultures, backgrounds, sexes, ideologies and religions can come together and compete without biases”.

The use of hijab, burqa and other dress codes for women has been in media focus around the world. In the context of war on terror after 9/11 and more recent attacks in Paris, Nice, Brussels, Istanbul and elsewhere, many media tackle this issue from the perspective of religions' differences.

 
US Elections, Media Coverage and Minorities' Issues PDF Print

Published: 10 November 2016

Country: USA

Trump_Journalists"I honestly don't know what to say. I am a woman. I am a woman of color. I am an immigrant woman of color. I am an immigrant non-Christian woman of color. And I'm viscerally horrified at the direction this country has taken, though, as my friend Brig Feltus notes with her poignant words, I should not be surprised,” wrote Nirmala Nataraj on her Facebook wall after Donald Trump was elected to be the next president of the United States.

There have been many articles, interviews and comments on what Trump’s victory means for the future of the country and the world, how it will affect racial relationships amongst the American population and what percentage of the immigrants should be worried when they become openly told that they are not welcome anymore. Without simplifying reasons and circumstances that brought Trump to the White House or trying to blame anyone for the fact that 47,5% of the American voters wanted him as the president, it is important to put the media under the spotlight. Were the American media treating racial, ethnic and gender issues enough when reporting on Trump-Clinton electoral race? How often journalists talk to the people such as Nirmala Nateraj? How often they ask them for the opinion?

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 3 of 55