MDI Against Religious Intolerance

GTTO_Logo_Web_Transparent

 

MDI Regional Offices

MDI-Global-Transparent

MDI Dune Voices

GET UNIQUE VOICES FROM SAHARA!

Read, share and republish stories

from Dune Voices multimedia platform.

Dune_Voices_logo_2

Follow MDI

Extra_TwitterExtra_FBExtra_YouTube

Reporting Ethnicity & Religion Study

reportethnicitymicro2

South Sudan People’s Voice

pvsmall01

Sign Up for Newsletter

To join the mailing list for the MDI newsletter send your email address, with the email subject 'Newsletter', to:

Email With Border v1.6

 

News & Events
#WalkAway: How the US Media Ignores Conservative Minorities PDF Print

17 November 2018

Country: United States

By: Safiya Ahmed

WalkAway“Once upon a time I was a liberal,” Brandon Straka, a self-described gay conservative hairdresser says to the camera, in a slickly-produced YouTube video that now has over 700,000 views.

“The left has been allowed to reinforce the narrative that everybody on the right is a bigot, a racist, a homophobe, a misogynist,” he continues, describing his transition from a typical Manhattan liberal to the leader of a conservative political movement.

“I reject racism of all kinds. I reject tyrannical group think. I reject a system that allows a misinformed and dogmatic mob to oppress free speech, spread false narratives and apathetically steam roll over the truth,” he continues.

 
Can Brazilians Use Internet Humor and Memes to Fight Bolsonaro's Hate Speech? PDF Print

16 November 2018

Country: Brazil

By Andréa Doyle

GretchenAs Brazilians, we are dead serious about our memes. Last year we nearly broke the Internet with Cuca the crocodile witch, a cartoon villain from the nineties who re-emerged as a gay icon. Gretchen, a former exotic dancer, turned pop star, turned small town mayoral candidate is currently having the greatest breakthrough of her career as our beloved “Meme Queen.” Her image is used by fans across the country to express everything from anger and sass to love for friends and family.

Brazil routinely vanquishes other countries in the Internet’s Global Meme Wars and recently established a museum solely devoted to our superb Internet culture. For us, a good meme is more than just a laugh; it is a way for us to harness the power of humor to mock what should cause us frustration or pain, and live up to the motto that Brazilians, “laugh in order not to cry.”

 
Report: Serbian Media Regularly Violates Serbian Journalists' Code of Ethics PDF Print

Published: 15 November 2018

Country: Serbia

serbian_newspapersEvery tenth newspaper story about children violates the Serbian Journalists’ Code of Ethics, a recent report has found.

According to the Centre for Media Professionalism and Literacy (CEPROM), the Serbian media rarely reports on children, and almost always focuses on sensationalist stories of child and drug abuse, accidents and violence. This paints children in an unnecessarily negative light.

The Media Diversity Institute of the Western Balkans (MDI Western Balkans) reacted to the CEPROM study, warning Serbian journalists and editors not to breach the ethical standards of reporting.

“Reporting child abuse, accidents, violence and drug abuse is already a very complex and sensitive task,” said MDI Western Balkans Executive Director Ivana Jelaca.

 
Rod Liddle's Track Record of Hate PDF Print

8 November 2018

Countries: United Kingdom

By Eline Jeanne

rodliddleLast month, Sunday Times columnist Rod Liddle came under fire for an article titled, Chip in and we’ll help Choudary on his way to Paradise—a commentary on British radical Islamist preacher Anjem Choudary that reads more like an Islamophobic rant than a column in a reputable newspaper.

In the piece, Liddle chastises Choudary for alleged support for the so-called Islamic State, and urges British Islamists to “blow themselves up – somewhere a decent distance away from where the rest of us live. Tower Hamlets, for example.” Tower Hamlets is, of course, one of the United Kingdom’s most diverse boroughs, with an established Muslim and Bangladeshi community—which has borne the brunt of Islamophobic hate crimes in recent years.

Rod Liddle’s column is disturbing, but more disturbing is that the British media continues to give him a platform, despite his track record of expressing racist, misogynistic, and transphobic sentiments in the mass media. Equally disturbing is the Independent Press Standards Organization (IPSO)’s lackluster response, despite receiving numerous complaints—in some cases, bordering on public outrage—over the past ten years.

 

 

 

 

 
Training: How to Cover People with Disabilities PDF Print

Dates: 24-26 October 2018

Country: Macedonia, Ohrid

Disability_Lemia_TOP_Last week, Media Diversity Institute’s “Disability: A Matter of Perception” project continued with a three day workshop in Ohrid, Macedonia. Over the course of the training, Executive Director of the Council of Media Ethics of Macedonia Marina Tuneva and Croatian journalist Daniela Drasata led journalists in a discussion on how to improve coverage of people with disabilities, particularly in the context of the Macedonian media.

Several people with disabilities attended thew workshop as guest speakers, sharing their experiences of how media representation had impacted them, and what they felt like the media could do better. Participants were also exposed to examples of good coverage of disabled communities, inspiring them for their future work.

“We do not think that the stories of people with disabilities—particularly their interests, challenges, and achievements are visible enough. There is a lot of room for improvement, starting with finding and developing these stories,” said Macedonian Institute for Media Program Manager Vesna Nikodinoska, who put on the event alongside the National Council of People with Disability Organizations of Macedonia.

 
This Year’s Central Asia Human Rights Festival Focuses on Diversity PDF Print

1 November 2018

Region: Central Asia

By Mikhail Yakovlev

BishkekBishkek, Kyrgyzstan will host the 12th annual Central Asia Human Rights Film Festival this month, honoring the seventieth anniversary of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights with a line up of twenty-four films exploring themes of diversity and discrimination.

Each film will focus on stories of people facing intersectional oppression and inequality, from a range of different countries, including but not limited to Kyrgyzstan, Russia and the United States. Many of the films tell stories of migrants, and women from around the world.

“Why do discrimination, injustice and poverty continue to grow seventy years since the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?” said Tolekan Ismailova, when asked why the festival is focussing this year’s festival around diversity and discrimination. She went on to say that even though Kyrgyzstan has lived through two revolutions, and a period of ethnic violence in recent history, many of those who suffered the most have still not received full compensation, and continue to experience discrimination when it comes to accessing justice and basic human rights.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 2 of 208